New Climate Economy: the business case for municipal and citizen climate change action

Date: 
March 3, 2017 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm

Location

BC Hydro Theatre, CIRS Building, UBC
2260 West Mall
Vancouver , BC

sunset-city.jpg

 

What is the economic case for low carbon development in cities? What are the most cost and carbon effective options for different sectors and the best ways of reaching low carbon targets? These questions are being examined in multiple cities around the world.

Globally, research shows that low carbon urban development is not a cost but an investment capable of unlocking substantial savings streams and significant co-benefits at the regaional and local government scale. Locally, studies show how cities can stimulate their economies through smart policies and well-targeted investments in low carbon development across the housing, commercial buildings, transport, industry and waste sectors.

Join us for a conversation on how a compelling new climate economy can help cities leverage low carbon development as an economic driver for urban sustainability.

This event is free and open to the pulic, please register to reserve your seat. 

Moderator

James Tansey, Executive Director of the UBC Sustainability Initiative, will open the session and facilitate the interactive discussion following presentations from the panel members:

Panelists

Andy Gouldson, Director, ESRC Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy and lead of the Climate Smart Cities programme, University of Leeds

Moura Quayle, Director, Liu Institute for Global Issues, the University of British Columbia

Matt Horne, Climate Policy Manager, City of Vancouver

Free and open to the public yet registration required to attend in person as space is limited and lunch is provided.

This event is brought to you by the British Consulate-General Vancouver, the Pacific Institute of Climate Solutions, the UBC Sustainability Initiative, the City of Vancouver, the University of Leeds, and the Liu Institute for Global Issues.

image source: nasa.gov credit Wikimedia Commons