Sea Level Rise and Forced Migration - The Challenge of Climate Refugees

Date: 
October 19, 2017 - 7:00pm

Location

Room 1900 - Fletcher Challenge Theatre, Simon Fraser University Harbour Centre
515 West Hastings Street
Vancouver , BC

Who will be tending your garden when the ocean rises? An octopus? A sea star?

SFU's Adaptation to Climate Change Team (ACT), the Pacific Water Research Centre in Faculty of Environment and Dialogue Programs in partnership with the Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions, the City of Vancouver, Vancouver Board of Parks and Recreation and the Vancouver Aquarium are pleased to invite you to the fourth talk in the Octopus’s Garden Series featuring Dr. Saleemul Huq, Director, Centre for Climate Change and Development, London, U.K. (via video conference); James Horncastle, Lecturer, Hellenic Studies, Simon Fraser University and Anna Zhuo, Co-founder, Climate Migrants and Refugees Project, Vancouver.

This talk is free and open to the public. Please register to save your seat. 

Saleemul Huq joined the International Centre for Climate Change and Development in 2009 as the Director and is also a Senior Fellow at the International Institute for Environment and Development. He is an expert on the links between climate change and sustainable development, particularly from the perspective of developing countries. He was the lead author of the chapter on Adaptation and Sustainable Development in the third assessment report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, and also for the chapter on Adaptation and Mitigation in its fourth assessment report. His research currently focuses on the least developed countries’ vulnerability to climate change and the impact of adaptation measures.

James Horncastle is a lecturer in the Hellenic Studies program at Simon Fraser University. A specialist in the history of the Balkans, Dr. Horncastle’s research focuses on how conflict and refugee movements helped give rise to the contemporary national and state identities in the region during the Twentieth Century, on which he has published extensively. Currently, Dr. Horncastle is pursuing research on the role of population movements and security in Southeast Europe. The contemporary refugee crisis has brought into sharp relief the security issues brought on by population movements, but this is not a new phenomenon. Dr. Horncastle’s current project helps show how climate variances have played a crucial role in the past in facilitating both population movements and conflict in the twentieth century, and how states and peoples responded to these developments in the past can help inform future responses.

Anna Zhuo is a co-founder of the Climate Migrants and Refugees Project, a non-profit organization working to increase capacity for urban resilience and planning in the face of climate change and global migration. She is from Vancouver and has a Master's in Community and Regional Planning from UBC SCARP. Her experience as part of an immigrant family and involvement with the temporary resettlement of a refugee family drives her interest in advancing settlement and integration planning in Canada and she recently attended the Habitat III conference in Quito as part of the Canadian delegation. Anna’s multidisciplinary interests stem from her academic background in life science and psychology, in addition to work experiences in health geography research, campus planning and sustainability, and urban development research on implementation challenges.

This event is part of the Octopus's Garden: Planning for Sea Level Rise Series, hosted by SFU's Adaptation to Climate Change Team (ACT), the Pacific Water Research Centre in SFU’s Faculty of Environment and the Centre for Dialogue in partnership with the Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions, the City of Vancouver, Vancouver Board of Parks and Recreation and the Vancouver Aquarium.