Climate Risk Assessment

Inclusive knowledge and evidence to inform climate risk assessments in British Columbia. 

Floods, droughts, heatwaves, and wildfires are increasingly affecting communities and ecosystems across British Columbia.

Climate risk assessments can lay a foundation for actions that better protect communities and ecosystems. However, to be effective, climate risk assessments should reflect current evidence and data, as well as the insights from diverse and inclusive perspectives. 

Evidence Based Guidance on Integrating Research into Climate Change Risk Assessments in British Columbia

PICS has convened leading experts, practitioners, and Knowledge Holders to discuss and document best practices for climate risk assessment and identify pressing information gaps. Through a series of workshops, this project, Evidence Based Guidance on Integrating Research into Climate Change Risk Assessments in British Columbia, will develop research agendas and set of recommendations for the province on climate risk assessment practices.

This project received financial support from the Government of British Columbia, Ministry of Emergency Management and Climate Readiness, in support of the ministry’s mandate to evaluate climate risks.

Projects

Enhancing climate risk assessment

Inclusive knowledge and evidence to inform climate risk assessments in British Columbia

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Innovative solutions to identify and adapt to climate risks

PICS supports research and engagement that helps Nations, communities, and municipalities create policies and take actions to be more resilient to major climate risks. Those risks can include extreme weather, floods, wildfire, heat emergencies, and resulting impacts like power outages.

This work generates insight and solutions that can reduce risk of disasters, transforming communities and ecosystems to better weather our changing climate.

Jericho Beach Park in Vancouver during an episode of winter flooding. There are sandbags in the foreground, topped with snow. In mid-ground, the park grass is covered with a layer of water. The sea is beyond.

Gimme shelter: Upzoning for climate risks

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A sea wall separates one body of water from another. Below, in white type, is the title "Living with Water".

Video: Planning for sea level rise on B.C.’s South Coast

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Enhancing climate risk assessment

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Cooling the city through urban forests

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